“Some old-fashioned things like fresh air and sunshine are hard to beat. In our mad rush for progress and modern improvements let's be sure we take along with us all the old-fashioned things worth while.” Laura Ingalls Wilder

Friday, October 24, 2014

Popped Corn at Home

I try to limit boxed snack items.  The exception is hubby's saltine crackers.  



Keeping fresh popping corn on hand makes for a quick, effortless snack.

I don't trust the corn supply in the USA to be non-GMO (although I've read that popping corn is not), I buy organic popping corn .. or popping corn on the cob at our local u-pick farm.  

Pop the corn in a good quality oil.  Of late, I've been using avocado oil as it has a high heat index, and other health benefits.

Place popped corn into a very large bowl.  To the empty hot pan, place a few tablespoons of good quality butter.  The residual heat should be enough to melt the butter.  Add a pressed clove of garlic, if desired .. swirl and pour over the popped corn.  Sprinkle with sea salt .. toss in some dried herbs, and grated aged Parmesan cheese.  Toss well. 

Did you know that October is 'National Popcorn Month'?  Read more about the history of pop corn here.

Chosen Foods Avocado Oil   (best price I've found is at Costco .. about $10 for 33.8 fl oz)
 

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

For now ...

newly remodeled pantry
... we have a three season pantry.

But oh how nice it would be to have a four season garden production and stored goodness.  This link has much to offer for overwintering plants and food storage.  Time .. that's all it takes!  And .. preparation.  Our forefather's had no option .. and it's a good thing to put into practice ... add to your skills .. each year another food storage method.  THE FOUR SEASON PANTRY

Tiny steps taken one after the other, year after year can lend to building your food storage skills.  Beginning with herbs and a few easy to grow crops such as lettuce and spinach can give you the impetus to add more variety the following season.  Then .. starting seeds in pots late winter .. and eventually ending up with some type of cold frame or hoop house for winter greens.

Don't feel bad, I'm stuck at the THREE SEASON PANTRY and have been for quite some time.

I'm happy to have added fruit to our seasonal and canned goods pantry.

Do you have a seasonal pantry?  Extra garden goods stored away?  Overwintered cold hardy greens?






Lumbering Along

... slow and methodically.

Fall is creeping into the North Woods.  Our garden has only had one light frost .. just enough to wipe out the cucumber plants and damage the basil.  We've still got young lettuce plants, green onions, tomatillos, herbs, strawberries, raspberries and tomatoes clinging to the vine.

Our first crop of grapes gave us juicy sweet globes of goodness.  Black currents and a mix of berries were turned into juice concentrate to enjoy this winter with a splash of sparkling water.  Two half gallons of sour cherries are soaking in brandy, sugar and vanilla beans making a wonderful 'Cherry Bounce' liquor for winter ailments, and for sipping around the wood stove on cold, snowy nights.  I've been checking on it quite regularly .. ahem!

Apples were halfway harvested in late September and have been eaten, turned into apple pie, sauced ... with the remaining half of the crop still clinging to the trees turning sweeter and juicier with each passing autumn day.  Soon they will all be picked and some stored away for winter.  Our local wild turkeys enjoyed the bottom limbs of the trees eating leaves and fruit.  We did not spray or treat the trees this year .. and not one apple maggot or scab has been found!

Question to any of you that grow horseradish:  "Our's is hot for only one or two minutes after grating fresh.  Any tips for keeping the heat would be appreciated."

The compost bin is squirming with earth worms .. 

Wasps were not a nuisance this year.

Summer is a wrap ... onward into Autumn splendor!